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Latin American Studies Association (LASA)

International Congress

Pre-Congress Program

May 23, 2012
2:00pm – 6:00pm
San Francisco Marriott Marquis

Publishing symposium**

Exploring the Ins and Outs of Academic Publishing: An Insider's View

Philip Oxhorn, McGill University and Latin American Research Review

For many researchers, particularly new ones, the publishing process remains one of the great mysteries of academic life. And with so many alternatives out there for publishing your work, including a growing number of online media, it only seems to be getting increasingly complex. The goal of this symposium is to help shed light on the publishing process by bringing together the key decision makers to discuss the trends in academic publishing, including the growing role of online media, and the strategies most likely to lead to success. This symposium will be divided into two parts. Part I will be led by the editors of the leading journals in research on Latin America to discuss trends in journal publishing, the process involved in submitting and reviewing article manuscripts, including choosing the appropriate journal for submission of particular kinds of articles. Part II will be led by editors from some of the principal publishers of monographs on Latin America to discuss trends in book publishing, the process involved in submitting and reviewing book manuscripts, including choosing the appropriate publisher for submission of particular kinds of books.

Date: Wednesday, May 23, 2012
Part 1 (Journals) - Time: 2:00pm – 4:30pm
Part 2 (Monographs)- Time: 4:45pm – 6:00pm
Location: San Francisco Marriott Marquis

Open to all LASA members registered for the congress free of charge. Seating is open and is available on a first-come, first-serve basis. Participants can attend Part I, Part II or both.

Academic Workshop 1*

Getting the Most out of Large-Scale Survey Projects: Developing and Analyzing LAPOP’s AmericasBarometer

Mitchell A. Seligson, Vanderbilt University
Elizabeth J. Zechmeister, Vanderbilt University

The workshop leaders will announce unrestricted and free worldwide access to the raw data files for the entire AmericasBarometer series 2004-2012, including for the 26 countries included in the 2012 round, beginning December 2012. This initiative and the workshop are supported by a generous grant from the Tinker Foundation.

The AmericasBarometer by LAPOP (Latin American Public Opinion Project) is an extensive regional survey project that strives to apply best and sophisticated practices to collect important public opinion data that are of the highest quality. Three innovations that LAPOP has applied in recent times are a) handheld (PDA) units; b) experiments; and c) a novel sample design that allocates comparatively more cases per municipality for the purpose of supporting hierarchical modeling efforts that include observations at the sub-national level. The two-part goal of the workshop is to (1) provide information relevant to developing and analyzing AmericasBarometer data and (2) critically discuss these approaches and other cutting-edge practices relevant to getting the most out of large-scale survey projects. We aim to include participants whose future research might make use of AmericasBarometer data and participants whose own expertise in survey design and analysis, experiments, public opinion, psychology, and other relevant fields can contribute to an engaging and productive discussion of these issues. Individuals with no previous experience in the use of AmericasBarometer data are especially encouraged to apply.

Date: Wednesday, May 23rd, 2012
Time: 2pm – 4:30pm
Location: San Francisco Marriott Marquis
Enrollment limit: 20, by application

Application Procedure:
Submit a brief (one or two pages) CV that includes a couple of sentences describing current research interests to: lasacong@pitt.edu. In the subject line, type "LASA Workshop Application."

Application Deadline: Thursday, March 20, 2012
Notification: April 15, 2012

Academic Workshop 2*

Latin American Independence in the Age of Revolution

Sibylle Fischer, Dept. of Spanish & Portuguese and CLACS, NYU
Ada Ferrer, Department of History and CLACS, NYU
Sinclair Thomson, Department of History, NYU

Does the history of Latin American Independence belong to the revolutionary Atlantic? Did Latin American revolutionaries share the liberationist agendas and ideas of the revolutionary age? If we take our cues from classic and enduring works such as Palmer’s Age of the Democractic Revolution (1969) or Hobsbawm’s The Age of Revolution (1962) we would probably conclude that the answer is no. Even the 2011-2012 New York Historical Society exhibition, Revolution! The Atlantic World Reborn, which is revisionist in its focus on the antislavery revolution that gave birth to Haiti, casts the Latin American revolutions as a legacy rather than constitutive of the Atlantic Age of Revolution. What accounts for the absence of Latin America in so many otherwise broad accounts and reappraisals of the Atlantic revolutions?

This workshop will explore Latin American independence from an interdisciplinary perspective. We are particularly interested in innovative methodologies, comparative work in the Atlantic context, and work that studies the connections between antislavery, ethnic violence and the fears thereof, and the struggles for independence. New approaches to the canonical questions about Latin American Independence would also be good starting point for discussion: When did the revolutionary struggle in Latin American begin? Was there an Enlightenment culture? Were the causes of independence structural and internal to Latin America or rather contingent and derived from the political crisis in the metropolis? What was the role of subaltern actors in the revolutions? Were the revolutions “democratic”? The goal is not just to share new work about the revolutionary period, but to think whether and how a reconsideration of the Latin American political struggles might contribute to broader reappraisals of the Age of Revolution and to an Atlanticist research agenda.

Scholars from history, literature, political theory, and other pertinent fields in the humanities and social sciences are encouraged to submit a 1-page abstract for a brief 10-minute project presentation at the workshop. Precedence will be given to scholars with new, developing projects and a clear argumentative purpose. Maximum number of participants is 15.

Date: Wednesday, May 23rd, 2012
Time: 2pm – 5pm
Location: San Francisco Marriott Marquis
Enrollment limit: 15, by application

Application Procedure:
Submit a brief (one or two pages) CV that includes a couple of sentences describing current research interests to: lasacong@pitt.edu. In the subject line, type "LASA Workshop Application."

Application Deadline: Thursday, March 1, 2012
Notification: April 15, 2012

Academic Workshop 3**

"Radical Women. Body and Space in Latin American Art between the 60s and the 80s"

Andrea Giunta, Professor in Latin American Art History and Criticism, Director CLAVIS, Center for Latin American Visual Studies, Art History (UTexas, Austin)
Cecilia Fajardo-Hill Chief Curator Museum of Latin AMerican Art, Los Angeles (PhD de Essex)

Beginning in the post-War era, a radical and experimental process of investigation was undertaken by women artists in Latin America. Not only did they make inroads in the fields of photography, performance, video and conceptual art, they also generated areas of exploration that politicized the body. Bodies were taken not only as a point of departure for questioning the canon of art or formulating new iconographies, but also as the both real and symbolic support for social, political, and cultural violence. In a parallel investigation space was the focus of several developments. The body in the space and the space in itself; the space as a place from where it is possible to formulate a new order in the world.

This workshop will explore and discuss the work of Latin American women artists who inaugurated languages, concepts, and narratives during a period marked by abstraction, experimentation, revolutionary utopias, and the tension between dictatorships and post-dictatorships. Scholars from art history, literature, media studies, and other pertinent fields in the humanities are encouraged to submit a 1-page abstract for a brief 10-minute project presentation at the workshop. Maximum number of participants is 20.

Date: Wednesday, May 23rd, 2012
Time: 2pm – 5pm
Location: to be announced

Open to all LASA members registered for the congress free of charge. Seating is open and is available on a first-come, first-serve basis.

* Academic workshops 1 and 2 will have limited attendance based on applications. See instructions after each workshop description. Please apply to no more than one academic workshop.

** The symposium and Workshop 3 are open to all members, including those who participate in the academic workshops. There is no application fee. Seating will be available on a first-come, first-serve basis.

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